Skip to main content

Your DB and XDEMVY® Questions—Answered

illustrated demodex mite character

What You Need to Know About Demodex Blepharitis (DB) and XDEMVY

Images are character representations of Demodex mites.

illustrated demodex mite character

Questions about DB

Demodex blepharitis is an eyelid disease in which tiny mites, called Demodex mites, grow out of control and become infestations, especially around the eyes, which can lead to eyelid inflammation. Many people have these mites, but sometimes, they can increase in number and cause problems.1,2 Demodex mites can leave behind collarettes, or crusty flake buildup that surrounds the base of the eyelashes. Collarettes on the eyelashes can signal a DB condition.3

If you’re experiencing eyelid redness and crusties (collarettes), make an appointment to see an eye doctor and ask to be checked for DB.

Person-to-person transmission is limited because it requires direct close contact. These mites are sensitive to light and cannot survive for long without a host.4,5

If you’re experiencing eyelid redness and crusties (collarettes), make an appointment to see an eye doctor and ask to be checked for DB.

Yes, people across different ages can get DB. These mites are acquired shortly after birth. Their numbers might grow during our teenage years. But age is not the determining factor as to why someone might get Demodex blepharitis.3,6

If you’re experiencing eyelid redness and crusties (collarettes), make an appointment to see an eye doctor and ask to be checked for DB.

Questions about XDEMVY

XDEMVY is the first and only FDA-approved treatment for Demodex blepharitis (DB). It’s an eye drop that targets and kills the Demodex mites that cause eyelid redness and crusties (collarettes) due to DB.7

XDEMVY was studied for one 6-week course of treatment in patients with Demodex blepharitis, and study results have not been evaluated beyond the 6 weeks. Check with your eye doctor if signs and symptoms of Demodex blepharitis recur.

Instill one drop of XDEMVY in each eye twice daily (approximately 12 hours apart) for six weeks. If one dose is missed, treatment should continue with the next scheduled dose.7

If more than one topical ophthalmic drug is being used, the drugs should be administered at least five minutes apart between applications.

Contact lenses should be removed prior to instillation of XDEMVY and may be reinserted 15 minutes following its administration. 

Yes, it’s important to use it as advised by your doctor. In studies, patients placed one drop of XDEMVY in each eye twice daily (approximately 12 hours apart) for six weeks.7

The most common side effect in clinical trials was stinging and burning in 10% of patients. Other side effects in less than 2% of patients were chalazion/hordeolum and punctate keratitis.7

illustrated demodex mite paralyzed along with text that reads party’s over
References

References: 1. Fromstein S, Harthan J, Patel J, et al. Demodex blepharitis: clinical perspectives. Clin Optom (Auckl). 2018;10:57-63. 2. Rhee MK, Yeu E, Barnett M, et al. Demodex blepharitis: a comprehensive review of the disease, current management, and emerging therapies. Eye Contact Lens. 2023;49(8):311-318. 3. Trattler W, Karpecki P, Rapoport Y, et al. The prevalence of Demodex blepharitis in US eye care clinic patients as determined by collarettes: a pathognomonic sign. Clin Ophthalmol. 2022;16:1153-1164. 4. Liu J, et al. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010;10(5):505–510. 5. Bitton E, Aumond S. Demodex and eye disease: a review. Clin Exp Optom. 2020;46(9):1-9. 6. Elston CA, Elston DM. Demodex mites. Clin Dermatol. 2014;32(6):739-743. 7. XDEMVY [prescribing information]. Tarsus Pharmaceuticals, Inc; 2023.

References: 1. Fromstein S, Harthan J, Patel J, et al. Demodex blepharitis: clinical perspectives. Clin Optom (Auckl). 2018;10:57-63. 2. Rhee MK, Yeu E, Barnett M, et al. Demodex blepharitis: a comprehensive review of the disease, current management, and emerging therapies. Eye Contact Lens. 2023;49(8):311-318. 3. Trattler W, Karpecki P, Rapoport Y, et al. The prevalence of Demodex blepharitis in US eye care clinic patients as determined by collarettes: a pathognomonic sign. Clin Ophthalmol. 2022;16:1153-1164. 4. Liu J, et al. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010;10(5):505–510. 5. Bitton E, Aumond S. Demodex and eye disease: a review. Clin Exp Optom. 2020;46(9):1-9. 6. Elston CA, Elston DM. Demodex mites. Clin Dermatol. 2014;32(6):739-743. 7. XDEMVY [prescribing information]. Tarsus Pharmaceuticals, Inc; 2023.